Select city

Hotel Comparison

Currency Converter

ATTRACTIONS

Toronto Attractions

Casa Loma
Casa Loma

Casa Loma

Canada’s own castle, Casa Loma, is today owned by the City of Toronto and draws plenty of interest standing in medieval splendour on its hilltop site. The castle was formerly the home of Canadian financier, Sir Henry Pellatt, who engaged the noted architect E J Lennox to help him realise a life-long dream of building a castle. Construction started in 1911 and it took 300 men nearly three years to complete the impressive Casa Loma. Inside visitors can see the magnificent decorated suites, secret passages, and 800ft (244m) long tunnel, while outside it is possible to stroll through the beautiful five-acre estate gardens. Self-guided audio tours are available and the castle is open every day.

Address: 1 Austin Terrace; E-mail: info@casaloma.org; Website: www.casaloma.org; Telephone: (416) 923 1171; Transport: From Dupont station walk to Spadina Ave and Davenport Rd and climb the Baldwin Steps to the castle; Opening time: Daily 9.30am to 5pm; Admission: C$12 (adults), C$6.75 (children); other concessions available

Toronto Attractions

CN Tower
CN Tower

CN Tower

Standing 1,815ft (553m) high, Toronoto’s landmark CN Tower is the world’s tallest building, a celebrated icon, an important telecommunications hub and the centre of tourism in Toronto. About two million people visit the tower each year to take in the panoramic view and enjoy all its attractions. The tower was built in 1976 by the company Canadian National, who undertook the project simply to prove the strength of Canadian industry and solve the city’s communication problems. Since then tourist attractions and facilities have been added, and the revitalised tower opened to the public in 1998, proving a hit with locals and visitors alike. The tower has four look out levels. At the first at 1,122ft (342m) is an outdoor observation deck with a spectacular glass floor; somewhat higher at the next level is an indoor observation deck and the Horizon’s café, offering light meals high in the sky; at the 1,150ft (351m) level is a revolving restaurant, which rotates once every 72 minutes, allowing a stunning view of the city below while dining on the award-winning fare; finally comes the top level, at a dizzying 1,465ft (447m), known as the Sky Pod. At the top of the CN Tower visitors stand on the world’s highest public observation deck. The tower is situated in the heart of Toronto’s entertainment district, on the north shore of Lake Ontario.

Address: 301 Front Street West; Website: www.cntower.ca; Telephone: (416) 868 6937; Transport: Union Station; Opening time: 10am to 10pm daily in season. Phone for other seasonal hours; Admission: Rates vary from C$18.99 to C$31.99 depending on the ticket type

Toronto Attractions

Royal Ontarion Museum
Royal Ontarion Museum © www.flickr.com/photos/mariya_umama_wethemba_monastery

Royal Ontario Museum

Pride of place in this large and varied museum is held by the golden mosaic ceiling inside the main entrance to the building in Queen’s Park, Toronto. The ceiling is adorned with patterns and symbols representing cultures from around the world throughout the ages, and is made from cut squares of imported Venetian glass. The museum consists of three buildings housing 200,000 square feet (18,581 sq m) of galleries and exhibitions. The more than 40 galleries showcase art, archaeology and science exhibits. Among the most popular are dinosaurs, galleries of Chinese Art, a bat cave, a gem and gold room, exhibits about Ancient Egypt and Nubia, and the Samuel European Galleries.

Address: 100 Queen's Park; Website: www.rom.on.ca; Telephone: (416) 586 5549; Transport: Museum subway station or Avenue bus 5 from Eglington station; Opening time: Monday to Sunday 10am to 6pm, late opening until 9.30pm on Friday; Admission: Monday to Friday: C$20 (adults), C$14 (children), children under 4 free. C$10 (adults) and C$7 (children) on Fridays from 4.30pm to 9.30pm

Toronto Attractions

Siberian Tiger
Siberian Tiger © Toronto Zoo

Toronto Zoo

The Toronto Zoo covers 710 acres (287 hectares) and is divided into 'zoogeographic' regions. It features four major tropical indoor pavilions and several smaller indoor viewing areas, plus numerous outdoor exhibits with more than six miles (ten km) of walking trails. The zoo houses more than 5,000 animals representing more than 450 species; it draws more than 1,2 million visitors each year. It is located north of Highway 401 and is easily accessible by public transport.

Address: Meadowvale Road, Scarborough; E-mail: torontozoo@zoo.metrotor.on.ca; Website: www.torontozoo.com; Telephone: (416) 392 5900; Transport: Rouge Hill GO Train station; 86A Scarborough bus route or 85 Sheppard East bus route; Opening time: Daily 9.30am to 4.30pm (January to 11 March, 11 October to December); 9am to 6pm (12 March to 21 May, 7 September to 11 October); 9am to 7.30pm (22 May to 6 September); Admission: C$20 (adults), C$12 (children); other concessions available

Toronto Attractions

Distillery District, Toronto
Distillery District, Toronto

Distillery Historic District

The brick-paved streets of the pedestrianised village have been designated a National Heritage Site, containing the finest collection of Victorian era industrial architecture in North America. The historic Distillery District, spread across 13 acres (5 hectares) in downtown Toronto, is a development dedicated entirely to arts, culture and entertainment with its plethora of art galleries, restaurants, bars and live music venues. Founded in 1832, the Gooderham and Worts Distillery became the largest distillery in the British Empire until it ceased operations in 1990 after 153 years of production, and was opened in 2003 as the pedestrian-only village it is today. It is also a popular film location and its numerous festivals and special events attract thousands of people every month.

Address: Mill Street; E-mail: jb@thedistillerydistrict.com; Website: www.thedistillerydistrict.com; Telephone: (416) 364 1177; Opening time: Monday to Wednesday 11am to 7pm, Thursday and Friday 11am to 9pm, Saturday 10am to 9pm, Sunday 11am to 6pm. Hours of restaurants, cafes and shops may vary

Toronto Attractions

Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art
Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art © www.mocca.toronto.on.ca

Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art

Formerly the Art Gallery of North York, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art opened its doors in 1999 keen to display modern Canadian art that addresses current Canadian narratives. Situated in trendy downtown Toronto, Mocca boasts a collection of 400 artworks by 140 different Canadian artists, despite its small size. With most works created since 1985, Mocca offers great insight into contemporary Canadian society. A country once renowned for its loose immigration laws, Canada is home to a mix of cultures, which makes for a stimulating art world. Look out for group exhibitions with international artists and the annual Mocca Award in Contemporary Art.

Address: 952 Queen Street West; Website: www.mocca.toronto.on.ca; Telephone: (416) 395 0067; Opening time: Tuesday to Sunday from 11am to 6pm. Closed Mondays; Admission: Free

Toronto Attractions

Toronto Islands
Toronto Islands © City of Toronto

Toronto Islands

A chain of small Lake Ontario islands just offshore from the city, the Toronto Islands were created from a series of continually moving sandbars connected to the mainland by a frail peninsula, which finally disintegrated after a major storm in 1858. Only a short ferry ride from the mainland, the Toronto Islands provide a peaceful green refuge from the hubbub of the city and afford attractive panoramic views of downtown Toronto. Hire a bike or relax on the beach, take the kids for a day at Centreville Amusement Park or have a languid picnic in one of the many designated leafy areas.

Address: Toronto Island Ferry Docks, foot of Bay Street and Queens Quay; Website: www.toronto.ca/parks/island/summerschedule.htm; Telephone: Toronto Island Ferry: (416) 392 8193; Transport: The Toronto Island Ferry operates daily from 9am to 10pm and leaves every 30 minutes. It travels to Hanlan's Point, Centre Island and Ward's Island; Admission: C$6 (adults), C$2.50 (children). Concessions available

Toronto Attractions

Gardiner Museum Fa�ade
Gardiner Museum Fa�ade © Shai Gill

Gardiner Museum of Ceramics

Housed in an attractive building across from the Royal Ontario Museum, the Gardiner Museum of Ceramics is one of the city's finest examples of modernist architecture. Giving visitors a glimpse into a universal art form that has spanned centuries, the Gardiner Museum exhibits over 3,000 historical and contemporary ceramic pieces. With earthenware of all different shapes and sizes from the ancient Americas, China, Japan, the Italian Renaissance and more, a tour through the museum will shape visitors' understanding of the development of the ceramic process. On Friday evenings visitors can try their hand at sculpting and wheel throwing in the open clay studio or attend free films and seminars.

Address: 111 Queen's Park; Website: www.gardinermuseum.on.ca; Telephone: (416) 586 8080; Opening time: Monday to Thursday 10am to 6pm, Friday 10am to 9pm, Saturday and Sunday 10am to 5pm; Admission: C$12 (adults), C$6 (students). Children under 12 years go free. Free entry on Friday between 4pm and 9pm

Toronto Attractions

Kensington market
Kensington market © www.flickr.com/photos/accordionchick

Kensington Market

A National Historic Site, Kensington Market embodies Toronto's multicultural society. Founded in the early twentieth century by eastern European Jewish immigrants and Italians, the area was renowned for its open-air market, evocative of those found in Europe. Home to immigrants from the Caribbean, China, East Africa and Vietnam War veterans, Kensinton Market is an infusion of world cultures, all of whom have left an imprint in the music, shops and restaurants of the area. A hybrid of cheap eclectic clothing retailers, fresh produce stores, cheese merchants, fishmongers, cafés and general bric-a-brac stores, the Kensington Market area offers a rambunctious downtown atmosphere. The most prominent streets are Augusta Avenue and Kensington Avenue.

Address: Area bordered by Spadina Avenue, Dundas Street, Bathurst Street and College Street; Website: www.kensington-market.ca; Opening time: Open seven days a week. Most opening hours are 11am to 7pm, although fresh produce stalls usually open earlier

Toronto Attractions

Harbourfront Centre
Harbourfront Centre © David Milgram

Harbourfront Centre

With an idyllic setting right beside the lake, the Harbourfront Centre is the spiritual heart of the city where locals gather on weekends for some gallery hopping, shopping, biking and concerts. Used as an industrial docklands for decades the abandoned warehouses and disintegrating factories have been transformed into a treasured recreational and cultural public space. Stroll along the waterside promenade, indulge in theatrical performances and browse craft boutiques or head to Queen's Quay Centre for some superb shopping. Year round events at this urban playground include film, dance, theatre, music, children's events and marine events.

Address: 235 Queen's Way; Website: www.harbourfrontcentre.com

Toronto Attractions

Monument to players
Monument to players © Hockey Hall of Fame

Hockey Hall of Fame

Any avid hockey fan must make a turn at Toronto's Hockey Hall of Fame, an ode to hockey's greatest players and most prized teams. A shrine to Canada's national sport, visitors can learn about the history of the game through memorabilia from every era, hockey artefacts from around the world, interactive exhibits and images of great moments in hockey history. Marvel at Terry Sawchuck's goalie gear, Newsy Lalonde's skates and the stick used by Max Bentley. The Stanley Cup never fails to delight visitors and most fun is had trying a hand at shooting or goalkeeping in the interactive displays. You won't be disappointed.

Address: 30 Yonge Street, Brookfield Place; E-mail: info@hhof.com; Website: www.hhof.com; Telephone: (416) 360 7765; Opening time: Monday to Friday 10am to 5pm, Saturday 9.30am to 6pm and Sunday from 10.30am to 5pm; Admission: C$13 (adults), C$9 (children). Concessions available